Windows 10 Creator’s Update and more

My afternoon consisted of a few hours of downtime on the PC while I installed the Creators update.  My understanding is that the console was 16 colors only, and Creators update would expand that.  It’s a shallow reason, but I was bored, so…..  I did it.

After finding a .bashrc file I used (not sure if I’m sold on it, so I’ll prolly end up tweaking it), I did see the increased color depth with a script test.

I have to say though, man, it wasn’t as easy or obvious to find an answer on HOW to enable it as I would have expected it to be.  There were hints here and there.  But one of the bigger issues are old results that are either not relevant or references to the current situation are speculation (e.g. “in the future they’ll have 24 bit color.  We don’t know anything about it yet, but stay tuned!”) (hyperbole firmly intended).

Regardless.  I got to use that downtime to actually clean my room finally.  How amazingly productive I can be when the computer is off.

So I had that .bashrc file copied.  I was slightly foolish as I didn’t actually read the full script.  Now, nothing nefarious was afoot, but the dude who posted it remapped “nano” to vim.

So I decided I’d pathname launch it.  /usr/bin/nano.

No dice.  OK, so I “which nano”.

/bin/nano

Sweet.  Then I thought.  “which nano” returns “/bin/nano”.
What if I treat it as a variable to be parsed by the command line?

So instead of typing “/bin/nano” which is what I was going to do, I thought

What if I type:

$(which nano)

Would it treat it as me calling the reference “/bin/nano”?

BOOM YES IT DID!

So like – it *shouldn’t* come as a surprise, it makes logical sense, but oft-times things don’t come together as you may expect.  The fact this did means it was a pleasant surprise that the thing actually worked the way I had assumed.

It was just a happy tech moment/playfulness/discovery moment in a world where tech seems so maddening at times for many reasons (Working in the telecom field has given me a whole new appreciation for system complexity, let me say that.  Even more than programming has.)

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